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Managing intestinal worms and other internal parasites

Along with flea treatments, all cats should also be regularly treated for both roundworms and tapeworms, as these worms are very common in cats. In some places, cats will also need to receive treatment to prevent heartworm infections too. Almost every kitten acquires roundworms at a very young age and thus treatment needs to start early (typically treatments being given every 2 weeks starting at around 3 weeks of age, and then monthly from around 9 weeks of age until 4 to 6 months old). For adult cats, a drug active against both roundworms and tapeworms is required, with treatments carried out regularly – typically every 2 to 3 months.

As with flea treatments, a wide range of wormers are available for cats, but many older treatments available via pet shops or supermarkets are less effective than treatments available from your veterinary clinic so it is always best to ask their advice.

If there is uncertainty about whether worm treatment is being successful or whether a different treatment option may be better, your vet may suggest examining a sample of faeces from your cat to look for the presence of parasites.

**Include other parasites**